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The DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum

Williamsburg, Virginia is one of the country’s top tourist destinations for people who are interested in American and especially colonial history. While the heart of the city of Williamsburg is in itself a stunning colonial resort with lots of lovingly recreated buildings and scenes, as well as plenty of good places to explore, shop, eat drink and play, to get the most out of your visit it really pays to visit the museums. The DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum is one of the finest collections of its kind, featuring an extremely large selection of antiques and artifacts from the 19th, 18th and 17th centuries.

With over 8,000 things on display, this is somewhere you can spend hours taking in the beautiful and fascinating exhibits, which include paintings, sculptures, furniture, metalwork, pottery, clothing and textiles, guns and glassware. In addition to the diverse, rare and valuable things you can see, you can also sometimes attend live musical performances and historical talks here at the DeWitt Wallace museum, in the Hennage Auditorium.

Entry to the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum is included in your admission ticket for the Colonial Williamsburg Revolutionary City, so it is a really good idea to make time to see it while you are there. All of the various ticket packages available for Williamsburg, including the day pass, the multi day pass which lets you visit for three consecutive days, and the combination tickets that also include Busch Gardens or the other historical sites at Yorktown and Jamestown also grant you entry to the museum, so you won’t need to pay extra to see this great collection no matter which option you choose to enter Williamsburg.

 

For more information about the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum you can contact them on 757-229-1000 or mcottrill@cwf.org, or you can visit their website for further details on any upcoming events at http://www.history.org/History/museums/dewitt_gallery.cfm.